Bordeaux Red: Lussac-St-Emilion

One of the oldest historical features of Lussac is the Gallic megalith centered in a small oak wood called the ‘Tertre de Picambeau’, where rites were celebrated before the Christian era. It is believed to have been constructed around 3000 B.C. During the Gallo-Roman period, someone named Lucius or Lucciacus was the one to first plant vines on the surrounding hillsides. The estate bore his name and the original boundaries of this hamlet. Around the eleventh century, the Cistercian order settled in the area and nurtured the vineyards to give Lussac its initial reputation for wine. Their abbot, the baron de Lussac, payed homage to his superiors, the archbishops of Bordeaux, who served the wine to their guests. During the late Middle Ages, this area was overrun by Barbarians and it suffered from numerous wars. It wasn’t until late in the 13th century that the vineyards were slowly rebuilt, and it took a few more centuries for the wines to reclaim the reputation that they had centuries earlier. The appellation has a gravelly and sandy/gravel plateau to the west of the village, limestone to the east, heavy clay soil to the north and clayey-limestone to the southeast much like Saint-Émilion.

  • La Fleur de Chateau Haut Piqaut

    This is the first-ever release for export of la Fleur de Château Haut-Piquat, made only in the best vintages in very small quantities. Harrison Jones was able to secure only one half of this fabulous vintage for the US market, a mere 210 cases.

    From the satellite Saint-Émilion appellation of Lussac-Saint-Émilion, this property has one of the best terroirs in Lussac, on the outskirts of the village itself. The property consists of over 40 hectares (close to 100 acres) near the summit of the hill known as Tertre de Picambeau. Seventy five percent of the property is vineyard, on clayey-limestone soil, planted to 75% Merlot, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, and the balance in Cabernet Franc. This special cuvée, however is made of entirely Merlot, from the ripest grape clusters in the vineyard. Since 1971, the owner of the Château is M. Jean-Pierre Rivière, whose family has been in the wine business for generations. M. Rivière has, over the last 3 decades, improved the vineyard, modernized the winery, and renovated the buildings, with the quality of wine in mind.

    The density of planting is 5400 vines per hectare, with plateau and sloping terrain. The vines are 30 years old on average and harvesting is done by hand. Thermo-regulated vats keep the temperatures correct for maximum fruit extraction. For this cuvee, vinification lasts 21 days before the aging in new oak barrels for 18 months. This wine is reminiscent of a St. Emilion Grand Cru, with rich, ripe Merlot aromas of black fruits, vanilla, oak, and soil. A blend of modern and traditional styles with a bouquet of ripe black and red fruits on the palate with a smooth, richly earthy mid-palate that shows ample structure and a lengthy finish of ripe fruit mingling with the tannins. It is a richly elegant and sophisticated wine.

    Point of Sale Wine Label Wine Bottle
  • Chateau Haut Piqaut

    The density of planting is 5400 vines per hectare, with plateau and sloping terrain. The vines are 20 years old on average and harvesting is done by hand. Thermo-regulated vats keep the temperatures correct for maximum fruit extraction. Vinification lasts 21 days before the aging in oak barrels and vats for 18 months. The wine is a delightful blend of modern and traditional styles with a bouquet of ripe red fruits on the nose with a smooth, earthy and silky mid-palate with ample structure and a lengthy finish. It is an elegant and sophisticated wine, reasonably priced, that does not need a special event to be enjoyed.

    Point of Sale Wine Label Wine Bottle